Thursday, October 24, 2013

Halloween Greetings!!



Booooooooo!!!

Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to the following copyrighted material. For permission to reprint or excerpt it and/or link it to another website, contact them at  


With palm trees rustling in the wind and eerie shadows cast over the ocean, you can feel that Halloween is almost here.

SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel were curious about “things that go bump in the night” and decided to do some research on Halloween.


Originally called “All Hallows Eve” – Halloween dates back over 2000 years ago to pre-Christian Celtic festivals in Ireland that honored the dead.


Bonfires were lit to aid souls as they journeyed to the underworld. 


A day when ghosts, goblins and spirits of all kinds might be about, it was a day when mischief could happen.


Later incorporated into the beliefs of Christianity by the Catholic Church, the day evolved into the scary day that it is now…with costumed merry-makers going house-to- house asking for treats. 


A holiday that is celebrated worldwide, today Halloween is second only to Christmas in America when it comes to consumer spending with close to $8 billion going for treats, costumes, decorations, parties and more.


So, if you’re in a spooky mood, join in the festivities – carve a pumpkin, drink apple cider, trick-or-treat, or party on the beach!



Just be sure to clean up after – your apple cores and candy wrappers!

Stash Your Trash on Halloween

When you’re dancing around the fire
watch out for goblins, ghosts and gyres.
 



It’s nice to have a yummy treat…
Good and Plenty’s, Reese’s Cups, and candy corn to eat.


But, don’t toss your trash on the beach
when recycling cans are in reach.


Remember that Bag Monsters are always near.
You never know when they’ll appear.


With bulging eyes and shark-like teeth to chew,
If you litter, they’ll get you!

Happy Halloween!!!


SurfWriter Girls Sunny and Patti



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Thursday, October 17, 2013

Surfing Center’s Celluloid Surf Memories



Surfing Heritage and Culture Center
Celebrates Surfing

Second in a Two-Part Story

Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to the following copyrighted material. For permission to reprint or excerpt it and/or link it to another website, contact them at  


The Surfing Heritage and Culture Center in San Clemente has an incredible collection of photographs depicting the early days of surfing as it evolved into a major sport and unknown surfers became legends. 


There are more than 200,000 images in the center’s files, ranging from snapshots in family photo albums to iconic moments in surfing history captured by professional photographers.


And the center’s goal is to digitize and preserve all of them.



Surf photographer Steve Wilkings, the center’s photo archivist, told SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel, “It will take years to do it. We have over 130 different collections of photographer’s works. Some are just a few pictures. Others are in the thousands.”


Wilkings, who was in the same surf club in Hawaii as acclaimed board shaper Ben Aipa, clearly relishes his task of rediscovering the “time in a bottle” images of the surf culture evolution and making them available for posterity.



Like finding an unexpected treasure on the Antiques Road Show, Wilkings never knows what he’s going to see when he looks through a box of photos or opens an old photo album.


Often the person bringing in the photos isn’t aware of their significance, either. Wilkings remembers “One photo album that was brought in had a photo right on the first page of Duke Kahanamoku…sitting in the sand at San Onofre with local surfing legends.”  

Among the works in the center’s collection are photographs taken by Warren Bolster, one of the first to document California’s skate and surf culture, innovatively using fish-eye lenses, strobes, deck-mounted cameras, and other means to get right into the middle of the action.


Works by underwater photography pioneer Clarence Maki are in the center’s archives, too. Maki, who created a water-proof plastic housing for his Rolleiflex camera so he could get better shots, was the last person to photograph Duke Kahanamoku riding a wave – capturing the moment August 24, 1954, on Duke’s 64th birthday.


One of the photo collections that interests Wilkings the most is an album of black-and-white photos taken in the 1960s by local architect Don Davis, a member of the San Onofre Surf Club. “Davis got a Polaroid camera and took photos of all the families in the club,” said Willkings. The photos were pasted in a book with the names and information about the family members noted on each page – providing a slice of California surf history.


Along with the photo collections...



the center also has vintage video footage of surfers and surfing spots from as far back as the early 1900s. 


One of the videos in the collection shows the Surfing Championship in Huntington Beach during the 1960s before it became The U.S. Open of Surfing



There are some interesting surprises in the center’s archives… like this video of the popular 1960s surf band The Ventures performing their mega-hit Wipe Out in Japan. 



Wilkings pointed out to SurfWriter Girls that the center has an extensive magazine collection, too, including “every U.S. surfing magazine ever published.”


With new photos being archived on a continual basis and special exhibits and events throughout the year, there’s always something new to see at the center.


Surfing Heritage and Culture Center founder Dick Metz is one of the key figures who helped to grow the sport of surfing…


and suggested the Cape St. Francis South African surfing spot to filmmaker Bruce Brown for his groundbreaking, 1966 surf movie The Endless Summer… conceived of the center as a place to celebrate surfing and the people and events that have made it what it is.   
   

The center’s goals of preserving the culture of surfing and inspiring new generations of surfers are summed up in its tagline: “Shaping surfing’s past, present and future.” 

In keeping with this, when SurfWriter Girls Sunny and Patti visited the center, Linda Michael, who oversees its events and membership programs, was giving a tour to a group of high school kids. Now, that’s a cool field trip!


The center is open Monday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, check its website: Surfing Heritage and Culture Center or call 949-388-0313. 

Located at 110 Calle Iglesia, just east of the I-5 freeway, in the heart of San Clemente, the center’s spacious and airy quarters are right in the middle of where much of California’s surf history began. 




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Sunday, October 6, 2013

Surfing Center Has Tsunami of Treasures



Surfing Heritage and Culture Center
Celebrates Surfing
 First in a Two-Part Story


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to the following copyrighted material. For permission to reprint or excerpt it and/or link it to another website, contact them at  


Looking for a real blast from the past? Then San Clemente’s Surfing Heritage and Culture Center (SHACC) is the place to go.


SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel couldn’t believe the tsunami of treasures that we found there, dating back to the early days of surfing. The center houses the world’s largest collection of historic surfboards and surf images.


Looking around the perimeter of the “board room,” we saw every type of shape, size and surfboard imaginable:


Longboards that belonged to legendary surfing pioneer Duke Kahanamoku, who introduced the world to surfing…



and Princess Kaiulani, a descendant of Hawaii’s King Kamehameha.


Dug-out canoe-style boards used by the early Polynesians...


vintage Hobie, Weber and Gordie surfboards from the 1960s.


The entire lineage of surfboards is displayed in chronological order – from 200 lb. wooden longboards that reach up to the ceiling…


to today’s light, bright foam and fiberglass models.



Studying each board, SurfWriter Girls Sunny and Patti tried to envision the people who made them and what it must have been like to ride the waves on them. 



In talking to Steve Wilkings, the center’s photo archivist, who gave us a tour of the facility, we learned that in ancient Hawaii the royals used servants to carry their longboards to and from the water since the boards were so big and heavy.


Visitors to the center and its website can find out about the different board shapers who have put their distinctive marks on surfboards over the years from early shapers, who worked on wooden boards…


to today’s high-tech shapers that use computer design and cutting techniques on polyurethane blanks layered with fiberglass sheets.

At SHACC’s recent Cooperfish Surfboard Show, highlighting board shaper Gene Cooper’s beautifully crafted boards, some of his coveted surfboards were made available for sale to the public.


Currently the center is holding an exhibit honoring legendary board shaper Donald Takayama, who passed away last year. Along with many of his surfboards, the exhibit includes photographs, memorabilia, and Takayama’s 1963 Plymouth Valiant. 


And, if you’re into longboards, stop by the center on Saturday, October 26th (from dawn to 1 p.m.) when the Longboard Collector Club is holding its annual meeting there.


You’ll get to talk to long board surfing enthusiasts and check out surfboards and collectibles that are for sale or trade. 


The center is open Monday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, check its website: Surfing Heritage and Culture Center or call 949-388-0313.


Located at 110 Calle Iglesia, just east of the I-5 freeway, in the heart of San Clemente, the center’s spacious and airy quarters are right in the middle of where much of California’s surf history began.

To be continued – Join SurfWriter Girls Patti and Sunny for a look at SHACC’s photo and video collection.



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