Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Surfer Slang - From A to Z


Learn the Lingo!


Written by SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel

Cowabunga! The waves were sick at dawn patrol and it was jammed in the lineup. Aggros were snaking. But, with so many barrels I stayed chill and got into the Green Room without any headers.

Whoa! What language is this? Surfer slang, of course. Surferese.



If you're new to surfing or have surfer friends and family, then it's important to know the lingo...even if it seems like you're trying to crack the secrets of the Rosetta Stone or learn to speak Norwegian. 

Luckily, you probably already know more surferese than you think because of all the movies, books and media that use it.

And, to make it even easier for you to figure out, SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel got some help from our friends at BookSurfCamps.com. They jumped on board and created this glossary for you. Compiled by Cristina Costea, it has everything you need.




So,check it out and see how many of the terms you know. Plus learn some new ones. Dude, it's easy! Even a kook can do it. Just click on: Surfer Slang    

 
Then you’ll be ready for Dawn Patrol.




Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given. 



Saturday, August 20, 2016

Lokahi Outrigger Canoe Club


Wahinis in Long Beach Paddle Out!

Written by SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel

Shortboards. Longboards. Standup paddleboards. Boogie boards. There are lots of ways to ride the waves. But, how about a way that even predates the Hawaiian kings? In an outrigger canoe – the same kind of canoe that brought the ancient Polynesians to the Hawaiian Islands.

 
 

SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel talked to Denise Islas, president of the Lokahi Outrigger Canoe Club in Long Beach, to find out more about this women's canoe club. Islas, who loves both the recreational and competitive aspects of the sport, said, "We paddle six days a week," joking that "on the other day I get to see my husband."

 

Truth be told, she gets to see husband Tony Islas every day because he’s the team's coach...and just as much a diehard fan of outrigger canoeing as she is.
Asked how they got involved in canoeing, Tony told SurfWriter Girls it began in 1997 after they moved from Hawaii to Petaluma, California: "Getting settled in, I happened on a fleet of outrigger canoes while riding my bike by the Petaluma River marina.”

“Later that day, when I told Denise about the canoes, she interrupted me, saying she met a member of the Lokahi Outrigger Club at the bank where she worked. Talk about synchronicity! He invited us to give it a try. We were homesick for the islands and this was the cure!"

Before long Denise, Tony and daughter Rachel (who had canoed in Hawaii) were all canoeing. Denise was the stroker, or seat one. Tony was in seat two. Rachel was the steersperson. "We felt blessed," says Tony. "Not many parents can say that they have competed in a sport with their spouses and kids! And it was a great season."

But, opportunities in SoCal beckoned and soon the Islases moved again, hoping to join an outrigger club in LA/Long Beach. Instead, they ended up starting their own! With help from family and friends and mentor Sam Madeiros, the outrigger coach in Petaluma (and an avid pigeon racer, too!), the SoCal club was launched.  


Founded in 1998, the Long Beach branch of the Lokahi Outrigger Canoe Club is a member of the Southern California Outrigger Racing Association (SCORA), which is dedicated to organizing, encouraging and promoting Hawaiian ways and the Aloha Spirit."  

Based out of Mother's Beach in Belmont Shore (Appian Way at 2nd Street), the club has two racing seasons - end of January thru mid-September and mid-September thru mid- December (off season).


Sandra Shea, the club's vice president, and daughter Meg both canoe. What started out as a summer vacation activity for Meg is now a year-round ritual. Sandra says, "We love it!" She encourages others to come out and give it a try. Paddlers are always welcome, whether you're new to the sport or a veteran like assistant coach Iris Dulay (shown below).

Priti Vaidya Patel, Director of Therapeutic Recreation at Casa Colina Hospital in Pomona, praises the canoe club highly. She says, "Since 2004 it has been providing our participants with disabilities the amazing experience of canoeing. Tony Islas and his staff and volunteers are an absolute delight."

SurfWriter Girls learned that outrigger canoeing is a great way to exercise and build stamina. It also builds teamwork and friendships since each one in the canoe is critical to the crew's success.


Summing up why they do it, Tony says, "When the conditions and swells are right, nothing beats the feeling of paddling in open ocean and chasing down swells with five of your closest club members."

For the Lokahi Outrigger Canoe Club members it's the perfect way to embrace the Aloha Spirit.





Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given. 

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Summertime is Picnic Time!



Community Comes Together in O.C.

Written by SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel
Summer’s warm, lazy days are the perfect time for a picnic. Whether it’s at the beach, a neighborhood park or your own backyard, all you need is friends and food.

Dating back to the 1700s in France, picnics sharing a meal outside in a scenic setting became popular after the French Revolution in 1789 when the royal parks were opened to the public for the first.time.

Picnics offered a leisurely break from work and a chance to enjoy recreational activities.

Now they are an American classic.
SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel had a blast this weekend at Orange County's annual Celebration Recovery Picnica fun-filled day to celebrate overcoming life’s adversities. Sponsored by the Mental Health Association of Orange County and Jamboree Housing/HOMES, it brings the whole community together.

With hot dogs, watermelon eating contests, ice cream…



carnival games, music and more everyone was feeling the good vibrations.



Helen Cameron, an analyst with Jamboree Housing, and her husband Alan made sure that everyone got hot dogs and chili.   

Raul Fernandez, Homes Supervisor, Resident Services, and George Searcy, Vice President of Community Impact, kept the fun going with a water balloon toss.

Jim Farrell, an advocate with the Orange County Conservator Assistance Group, showed up to lend a hand and cheer people on.

Volunteer Michael Christian Martinez, who’s from the Philippines, said he got involved in the picnic because his grandmother Lucy Brimbuela has helped with it for 25-years and he wanted to share in the experience.
SurfWriter Girls found out that Martinez is an Olympic figure skater, ranked #23 in the world, and skated at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia representing the Philippines. You never know who you’re going to meet at a picnic!


Fernandez told SurfWriter Girls, "It takes a committee to plan out this event for all of Orange County. Jamboree is proud to be a part of it with the Mental Health Association of Orange County and Pam Presnall taking the lead.” Calling the picnic a “healing event,” Fernandez said, “Everyone is in some form of recovery.” It could be due to emotional, physical or other reasons and the Celebration Recovery Picnic celebrates people's accomplishments.
Watching everyone having a good time, Helen Cameron said about her work with Jamboree Housing, “The most exciting thing we are doing is taking people off the streets who are chronically homeless with a disability and providing permanent, supportive housing.” She added, “We couldn’t do it alone. It’s all about partnerships.”


Just like with picnics, we all need a little help from our friends.







Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given.