Saturday, September 7, 2019

Starfish Endangered


Ocean Ecosystems at Risk


Written by SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel

In philosophy and literature, the starfish is a symbol of enlightenment, magical powers and renewal. It’s able to regenerate and grow back limbs.


For all its abilities, though, it's currently facing a threat that could be even more powerful than it is – a wasting disease that is threatening to wipe out the whole starfish population.

Also known as sea stars, the colorful species found off the West Coast of North America is rapidly vanishing from sight.


“I’ve never seen a decline of this magnitude of a species,” said Drew Harvell, the lead author of a study in the journal Science Advances that has brought attention to the plight of the sea stars.


Once they were “as common as a robin,” Harvell observed, noting it was hard to imagine what was happening to them. A marine ecologist at Cornell University, she calls the epidemic "catastrophic and widespread" and explores this in her new book Ocean Outbreak.


Brought on partly by rising sea temperatures from global warming, the illness is affecting more than 20 types of starfish, with the sunflower sea stars normally found in the deep waters of the Pacific Northwest among the most susceptible.

The starfish aren't the only ones at risk. As their numbers drop, it causes a ripple effect that endangers other sea life who depend on them to keep the ocean's ecosystem in balance.


Starfish eat sea urchins, which eat the ocean's kelp beds that provide food and shelter to sea life and help remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Without the starfish to keep the sea urchins in check, the voracious urchins are devouring the kelp beds.


To save the starfish and other endangered marine life we’ll need more than magic. It will take scientists, government, and environmental groups working together.    



Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given. 


Tuesday, August 20, 2019

SurfWriter Girls Celebrate Eight Years


Channeling Our Energy!


Written by SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel

Like the waves in the ocean, eight is a symbol of infinity and a constant flow of energy and power.


That's good to know because for SurfWriter Girls it's our 8th year! Since writing our first blog post on July 20, 2011, SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel have written 264 feature stories about the people, places, events, organizations, and more that have an impact on the quality of life on our planet, whether it's the ocean, beach, environment or lifestyle. 

And, with the launch of our sister online publication Surf'n Beach Scene Magazine four years ago, we've been able to bring you even more stories!

Some of the stories we've shared with you this year include:

Surfrider's Rate Your Beach Report


World's Largest Ocean Cleanup


Best Winter Surfing Spots


Surf Artist Drew Brophy's Wonders


Dumbo Octopus Discovered


New Era for Tiki Bars


Women Making Waves


Puerto Rican Parrots Endangered


International Surfing Day


Wabi-Sabi - The Beauty of Imperfection


Catch the Sustainable Fashion Wave!


Vans US Open of Surfing


SurfWriter Girls Best Beach Books


Eight years. "It's hard to believe," says Sunny. "We're having so much fun the time goes by really fast." "Yes," says Patti. "And there are an infinite number of stories to tell."

Thanks to our followers worldwide for your support...especially the Surfrider Foundation Huntington/Seal Beach Chapter...


and Patti's husband Greg Kishel. We're excited to bring you more stories and to celebrate this eighth year with you! 


Sunny and Patti




Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given.