Saturday, February 9, 2019

Zack's On Board!


Is An Ocean Friendly Restaurant


A Surfrider Sponsor Story

Written by SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel

Longtime provider of all things for the beach – from beach chair, bicycle and surfboard rentals, suntan lotion, hot dogs, burgers, snacks, and more – Zack's is on board as the Surfrider Foundation's newest Ocean Friendly Restaurant (OFR) member.


Surfrider's Huntington/Seal Beach Chapter Advisory Board Director Tony Soriano and Zack’s founder Mike Ali announced that Zack's, which has been operating by the Huntington Beach Pier for 47-years, is a certified OFR participant now and will be utilizing methods that reduce the amount of pollution in the ocean and protect sea life.



OFRs pledge to follow environmental guidelines that emphasize reducing and recycling. That means avoiding polystyrene containers, plastic bottles and plastic take-out bags. Straws and plastic utensils for take-out orders are only provided on request. OFRs follow water conservation and energy efficient practices that preserve our natural resources.


Popular with surfers, locals and tourists alike, Zack's describes itself as "Your one stop shop for beach, food and fun!" Regulars keep coming back for its breakfast burritos, hamburgers and jumbo hot dogs, corn dogs and fish and chips. And, if you've always wanted to hit the waves, you can even sign up for a surfing lesson.


Ali, who runs the family-owned business, got involved in food service from his days in the Army when he used to feed the troops. Since then his focus has been on making sure that beach-goers in the OC have everything they need to enjoy a day of sand and surf.


And on Groundhog Day (Feb. 2), when the world focuses on Pennsylvania to see if local weather guru groundhog Punxutawney Phil sees see his shadow (predicting six more weeks of winter) surfers in Huntington Beach celebrate a different way –  gathering at Zack’s for Wavehog Day.  


Zack's also has a Zack's Too at Pacific Coast Hwy and Beach Blvd. and a Zack's Salt Creek on the Beach Burger in Dana Point, CA. So, when you're cruising along PCH there's always a place to go. 


 


Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given. 


Friday, January 25, 2019

Rate Your Beach



Surfrider Foundation 2018 Beaches Report



Written by SurfWriter Girls Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel

How would you rate your beach? Not just on its surfing conditions and location, but on how it's holding up to climate change, shoreline erosion and extreme weather. 



The Surfrider Foundation just released its annual State of the Beach Report Card, which grades 30 U.S. coastal and Great Lakes states and Puerto Rico on their policies to protect their coastlines.


The results for the past year aren't good, revealing that 23 of the 31 areas assessed are performing at only "barely adequate to poor levels."

Just eight states - California, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Washington - are doing a "fair or better" job. California leads the pack with the only "A."


This is critical both to the environment and the economy. As noted in the report authored by Stefanie Sekich-Quinn, coastal erosion causes approximately $500 million in property loss annually in the U.S., including damage to structures and loss of land. Along with this, to mitigate erosion impacts, the federal government spends an average of $150 million every year on beach replenishment and other shoreline erosion control measures.


If something isn't done, scientists predict that sea levels could potentially increase by up to six feet by 2100, causing chronic flooding of up to 2.5 million homes and affecting coastal economies, public access, recreation and healthy ecosystems.


The report emphasizes that significant policy improvements are needed. So is continued federal support for the Coastal Zone Management Act and funding for agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

With the right policies and support in place our efforts can take flight.


Sekich-Quinn gives part of the credit for California's top rating to the California Coastal Act, which was passed in 1976.


Protecting our oceans, waves and beaches takes work. When it comes to making environmental decisions or taking a side, we need to determine what’s important to us.


      SurfWriter Girls



Please post your comment below. Comments will appear the next day.


Sunny Magdaug and Patti Kishel hold the exclusive rights to this copyrighted material. Publications wishing to reprint it may contact them at surfwriter.girls@gmail.com Individuals and non-profit groups are welcome to post it on social media sites as long as credit is given.